1967 Kit Companion Project Part 2

On Part I of our 1967 Kit Companion Travel Trailer project, we shared how we found the trailer and decided to start the restoration process. This week, see how Jordan starts to demo and assess the trailer’s condition.

1967 Kit Companion

After pressure washing the exterior, it was time to start dismantling the trailer. Travel trailers are built from the inside out because the cabinets provide a lot of the trailer’s structural support. To take apart the trailer, we have to do the reverse and start from the outside, working in.

Jordan first removed the trim, windows, roof sheet metal and then finally the wall sheet metal.

1967 Kit Companion

Surprise, there’s rot! Well, not really much of a suprise. From the┬ásmell of the inside and the flex when Jordan pushed on the walls, we were expecting it.

Next, Jordan started removing the wall sheet metal (which he will use as a stencil to make the new walls).

1967 Kit Companion

Here Jordan discovered an ant nest in the front and mice nests in the back, and lots more rot.

1967 Kit Companion

1967 Kit Companion
Is it obvious yet? This thing is going to be a full on frame up restore. There’s just no salvaging these walls.

So Jordan started taking it down, beginning with the back wall.

1967 Kit Companion

1967 Kit Companion
Then the roof was removed, the remaining walls, and the interior.

1967 Kit Companion

And then he stripped it all the way down to the frame.

1967 Kit Companion

This trailer sat under an apple tree with the roof vent open for 33 years. Jordan knew that the thing would be rotten. That being said, this trailer wasn’t built very well to begin with.

Jordan has many plans for improving the design during restoration.

Stay tuned for Part 3, where Jordan will begin the rebuild process!

See more progress on the Kit Companion Restoration:
Part 3
Part 4

 

11 Comments on 1967 Kit Companion Project Part 2

  1. Jeremy Barringer
    February 12, 2015 at 6:58 pm (2 years ago)

    Holy shit guys!! Lol, can you say can of worms!! Unfortunately I need to do all this as well! Great job Jordan , this is Jeremy by the way from instagram I look forward to seeing the progress on this, also did you draw your own plan!? I’d like to see what you came up with

    Reply
    • kaijorblaylock
      February 12, 2015 at 8:00 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi Jeremy,

      Yeah I knew it was going to be a can full of worms. I haven’t drawn any plans but I have taken a lot of detailed notes with dimensions and lots of pictures. I plan to put it back together almost like it was originally with some improvements to water proofing and structure. How did you come across your Aljo? What year is it?

      -Jordan

      Reply
      • Jeremy Barringer
        March 21, 2015 at 7:09 pm (2 years ago)

        The aljo Is a 61, and I just opened her up, I’m excited all over again. A little nervous too, I use to camp in this trailer 15 years ago on a close friends property , it was rotting away and needed love so I asked for it and they gave it to me, you!

        Reply
  2. Toby
    February 13, 2015 at 1:08 am (2 years ago)

    Wow. How did you decide on this particular trailer brand? We have thought about doing the same thing but its hard to find a smaller trailer that still sleeps 4-5. I hope you didm’ pay much for it..:)

    Reply
    • kaijorblaylock
      February 13, 2015 at 5:10 am (2 years ago)

      Hey Toby,

      The deciding factors to purchase this particular trailer were, location (in Oly), title, price ($200), and the items that would be hard to replace (appliances, windows, and siding) were in overall good condition. The small trailers that sleep a lot usually have a bunk that is tiny, the Kit Companion could sleep a couple with 4 children if the children were young. I have thought that as children get older they might want to sleep in their own tent. Have you looked on craigslist for trailers? There are always lots of good ones in Boise!

      -Jordan

      Reply
      • Toby
        March 5, 2015 at 7:39 am (2 years ago)

        I have looked at a few, but I am shocked at what folks want for these little trailers. Where do you look for parts?

        Reply
        • Jordan & Kaisa
          March 13, 2015 at 8:00 pm (2 years ago)

          Hey Toby,

          Sorry we’ve been bad bloggers. It is 16′ with the cabin part is 12′. The are becoming quite the trend so if people know what they have they can be $$$. I’d say $4000 for one in great condition is a good price but I wouldn’t be happy paying that much still. What is your criteria for a trailer?

          Reply
  3. Pam G
    February 18, 2015 at 10:25 am (2 years ago)

    Cool to see what you are doing…my back half needs some work but not that much!

    Reply
  4. Toby
    March 5, 2015 at 7:41 am (2 years ago)

    How long is that trailer?

    Reply
  5. Kathleen
    May 6, 2015 at 9:45 pm (2 years ago)

    Awesome to see this! Funny that these trailers lasted as long as they did as they weren’t built well. But, apparently, they must have been built well enough. And can ya imagine sleeping in this bunks? I’m not going all out on my little Lucy as I want to use her now!!! Impatient, yes. With our dry climate, my Lucy isn’t that rotted in the corners. I’ll look forward to watching your progress!

    Reply
    • Jordan & Kaisa
      June 6, 2015 at 9:57 am (2 years ago)

      Hi Kathleen,

      Thanks for your comment. Yes, I am very surprised at how some of these trailers remain standing given the condition of the interior structure! It’s amazing.

      We would love to see pictures of your Lucy and hear your plans for her! Are you posting updates anywhere?

      Thanks,
      Kaisa

      Reply

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